kileyrae

kileyrae:

Proposed Texas textbooks are inaccurate, biased and politicized, new report finds

Findings:

  • A number of government and world history textbooks exaggerate Judeo-Christian influence on the nation’s founding and Western political tradition.
  • Two government textbooks include misleading information that undermines the Constitutional concept of the separation of church and state.
  • Several world history and world geography textbooks include biased statements that inappropriately portray Islam and Muslims negatively.
  • All of the world geography textbooks inaccurately downplay the role that conquest played in the spread of Christianity.
  • Several world geography and history textbooks suffer from an incomplete – and often inaccurate – account of religions other than Christianity.
  • Coverage of key Christian concepts and historical events are lacking in a few textbooks, often due to the assumption that all students are Christians and already familiar with Christian events and doctrine.
  • A few government and U.S. history textbooks suffer from an uncritical celebration of the free enterprise system, both by ignoring legitimate problems that exist in capitalism and failing to include coverage of government’s role in the U.S. economic system.
  • One government textbook flirts with contemporary Tea Party ideology, particularly regarding the inclusion of anti-taxation and anti-regulation arguments.
  • One world history textbook includes outdated – and possibly offensive – anthropological categories and racial terminology in describing African civilization.
  • A number of U.S. history textbooks evidence a general lack of attention to Native American peoples and culture and occasionally include biased or misleading information.
  • One government textbook … includes a biased – verging on offensive – treatment of affirmative action.
  • Most U.S. history textbooks do a poor job of covering the history of LGBT citizens in discussions of efforts to achieve civil rights in this country.
  • Elements of the Texas curriculum standards give undue legitimacy to neo-Confederate arguments about “states’ rights” and the legacy of slavery in the South. While most publishers avoid problems with these issues, passages in a few U.S. history and government textbooks give a nod to these misleading arguments.

The education publishers, sadly, aren’t going to fix this, as long as their fraudulent books are bought by Texas schools. I feel like one way to combat this would be for higher education, both inside and outside of Texas, to make it clear that meeting the Texas educational standards is going to work against entering college-level courses. Only if Texas students are prevented admission to more prestigious universities will there be a demonstrable backlash against the politicking going on in Texas education. But I don’t know. Do prestigious universities care more about education than tuition $$$$$?

thecomicsvault
thecomicsvault:

In 1972 NASA launched the "Jupiter Plaque", an engraved tablet depicting life on Earth and our location in the cosmos, for any intelligent life that may come across it.
The Los Angles Times asked several prominent artists to draw what they would have put on the plaque and why. To the surprise of everyone, Kirby the futurist and visionary drew two superbeings, a man and a woman, that would scare away potential conquerors. Suggesting to intelligent life that everyone on Earth are Supermen. This was his explanation:
"I see no wisdom in the eagerness to be found and approached by any intelligence with the ability to accomplish it from any sector of space. In the meetings between ‘discoverers’ and ‘discoverees’, history has always given the advantage to the finders. In the case of the Jupiter Plaque, I feel that a tremendous issue was thoughtlessly taken out of the world forum by a few individuals who have marked a clear trail to our door. My point is who will come-a-knocking, the trader or the tiger?"
JUPITER PLAQUE SUGGESTION (1972)By Jack Kirby (pencils/colors) & Mike Royer (inks)

thecomicsvault:

In 1972 NASA launched the "Jupiter Plaque", an engraved tablet depicting life on Earth and our location in the cosmos, for any intelligent life that may come across it.

The Los Angles Times asked several prominent artists to draw what they would have put on the plaque and why. To the surprise of everyone, Kirby the futurist and visionary drew two superbeings, a man and a woman, that would scare away potential conquerors. Suggesting to intelligent life that everyone on Earth are Supermen.

This was his explanation:

"I see no wisdom in the eagerness to be found and approached by any intelligence with the ability to accomplish it from any sector of space. In the meetings between ‘discoverers’ and ‘discoverees’, history has always given the advantage to the finders. In the case of the Jupiter Plaque, I feel that a tremendous issue was thoughtlessly taken out of the world forum by a few individuals who have marked a clear trail to our door. My point is who will come-a-knocking, the trader or the tiger?"

JUPITER PLAQUE SUGGESTION (1972)
By Jack Kirby (pencils/colors) & Mike Royer (inks)

What then for Andrew — not Andrew W.K. but Andrew, the person, who confuses the hell out of me, who I’ll probably never be lucky enough to see again and who, if he ever finds out about this essay, will probably file for a restraining order — who seemingly receives nothing but support for being a complete fake?

Meredith Graves, here

This is a good read, and I think she’s A-plus, 100% right about the misogynistic backlash to Lana Del Rey, but oh man do I have a problem with calling Andrew W.K. a “complete fake.” I really would expect a little more understanding, too, from a touring performer. Like, were Devo fakes because they all decided at one point to perform with flower pots on their heads? Was Bowie ever accused of being inauthentic for performing under a persona? (I honestly don’t care if he was.) Lady Gaga, anyone? What level of concern for theatricality will we accept from our musicians before we accuse them of falseness? Was Liberace a fake?

It’s a trick question (or maybe even wholly irrelevant), because even bands who decide to dispense with theatricality and performative personae have made a calculated decision (looking at you, Pavement). To decide to perform “authenticity” is every bit as performative as adopting a persona. Some performers just decide to really do it up, and I fully grant Graves that Andrew W.K. and Lana Del Rey are absolutely similar in that regard.

Another big problem I have with Graves’s argument is how she just can’t wrap her head around the fact that W.K. has spoken about performance art at the Guggenheim (High Art!) but has written and performed songs with titles like “Party Til You Puke” (Low Art!), and she extends the same low opinion toward W.K.’s audience. Like, no way anyone out there headbanging could actually be cultured, or be interested precisely in the seeming contradictions of a performer such as W.K. They’re all just gross boys; her argument depends on it. (And like, anecdotally relevant, but I’ve definitely known a lot more girls who are fans of W.K. than boys.) Like, what kind of stodgy old garbage-headed gatekeeping is all that? To paraphrase Walt Whitman, like, Andrew W.K. contains multitudes, bruh.

lifeaquatic

kmtam:

“Just two hours ago, allied air forces began an attack on military targets in Iraq and Kuwait.”

—President George H. W. Bush
January 16, 1991

“Good evening. Earlier today, I ordered America’s armed forces to strike military and security targets in Iraq.”

—President Bill Clinton
December 16, 1998

“My fellow citizens. At this hour, American and coalition forces are in the early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger.”

—President George W. Bush
March 19, 2003

“My fellow Americans. Tonight, I want to speak to you about what the United States will do with our friends and allies to degrade and ultimately destroy the terrorist group known as ISIL.”

—President Barack Obama
September 10, 2014

It’s weird how we keep bombing the shit out of the Middle East, and yet so many people there still hate America?